"Truth includes the fact no one is or can be a victim. There is no one to be not okay. There is no one to have anything wrong with them."

The Recovery Process - Page Two

Waking up involves reconnecting with who you are, and can only be, by letting go of who you can never be. Everyone is aways who they are, displaying the degree to which they fill time defending the fiction they are who they pretend to be. When you know who you are, you are free to directly observe how you fill time defending who you pretend to be.

Once this came into focus, what followed next was the insight that suffering is the price we pay for defending the fiction we are who we pretend to be. Suffering expands exponentially the more we fill time defending the fiction we are who we pretend to be. We suffer from the lie we can prove we are who we pretend to be, when that’s not possible. No one can be who they pretend to be. Once you wake up and reconnect with who you are, you are set free to witness where everyone is with who they are. You notice that those who display a high degree of humor are almost one with the truth of who they are. They are ready to laugh at how they fill time defending who they pretend to be. You notice that the more someone tries to prove they are who they pretend to be, the more they display desperation. Desperation is a clue they know nothing they do has any chance to rescind who they are.

Life is the arena that displays where we are with who we are. A client who enters psychotherapy is invariably busy filling time suffering from defending the fiction they can prove they are who they pretend to be. Those who almost know this, display a level of flexibility that makes it possible for them to reconnect with who they are who is busy filling time defending who they pretend to be. In many instances, they are quick to identify that all suffering stems from the fact they can’t defect from who we are, and feigning defection is what suffering is all about.

As a rule, most clients enter psychotherapy firmly entrenched in who they pretend to be, to the degree they have lost sight of who they are who is busy defending the fiction it’s possible to be who they pretend to be. As far as they are concerned, they display no memory for who they are. Truth includes the fact no one is or can be a victim. There is no one to be not okay. There is no one to have anything wrong with them. Who we are precludes the possibility something is wrong with us. There is no one to have a ‘damaged self.’ There is no one to have ‘low esteem.’ Who we are is always okay. Truth includes why this is a fact. This isn’t some clever metaphor, or some fancy “spiritual concept.” Who we are can’t be not okay. Truth reveals why we dismiss who we are in favor of playing the part of some kind of a ‘not okay person’; someone with a ‘damaged self.’ Truth reveals why it is virtually inevitable that we will fill time dismissing who we are so we can fill time impostering who we pretend to be. We don’t elect to do this: this is what we get to do in our reality. Everyone is eligible to reconnect with the truth of who they are, since no impersonation can prove defection from who we are is possible.

This brings us back to TRP. There are two ways to promote waking up to what the truth is. You can start with who you pretend to be, and work back to who you are who is busy defending the fiction you are who you pretend to be, or you can start with what the truth is so you can identify who you are who is busy filling time defending the fiction you are who you pretend to be. I have tried both approaches, and both take you to the same place, but the first method is very slow, and leaves too much time to filibuster and resist what the truth is. TRP starts with what the truth is, so you can identify who you are who is featured busy filling time defending who you pretend to be.

The motivation for engaging in TRP is simple: since you can’t defect from who you are, is suffering worth the effort? Suffering serves as an indirect clue that everyone already knows, at some pre-conscious level of knowing, that no one is or can be who they pretend to be. If defending the lie you can prove who you are is who you pretend to be, when that’s impossible, than all suffering in defense of this charade is redundant. Curiously enough, in defense of the fiction we can prove we are who we pretend to be, suffering is what we count on as proof for the lie we are who we pretend to be. We hate suffering, not just because it feels awful, but because we already know it won’t work to prove we are ‘the damaged person’ we insist we are. We suffer from defending the fiction we are who we pretend to be, and then we count on suffering to maintain the fiction who we are has a ‘damaged self.’ In this drama, suffering plays the dominant role in this parody.

Page One | Continued - Page Three